Egipto, palante

5 03 2011

Que lo que pasa en Libia no no despiste de que Egipto continúa en su persecución de democracia. La salida de otro del antiguo régimen lo atestigua. Aquí os reproduzco lo que he recibido ayer a través de Mideastwire:

On March 4, the Palestinian-owned Al-Quds al-Arabi daily carried the following opinion piece by Chief Editor Abdel-Beri Atwan:

“From time to time, the Egyptian revolution can still surprise us with its major accomplishments, despite the fact that President Hosni Mubarak was removed from his post almost a month ago. In this context, the ousting of the government of Marshall Ahmed Shafik, the last prime minister of the former era prior to the one-million-people demonstration to be held on Tahrir Square today, crowned its ongoing efforts to purify Egypt from all the remnants of this era. Indeed, Marshall Shafik is considered to be among the “pupils” of President Mubarak and his most loyal man, whether due to the friendship that ties them or to the fact that they both belong to the air force, which brought them together. Although the man might be honest and competent enough to assume this position, his selection by the ousted president to head the Cabinet during the wasted time of his rule constituted a lethal bullet.

“The biggest mistake that Shafik committed is not just his acceptance to form the government while the Egyptian street was rebelling and demanding the toppling of the regime, but also his insistence on maintaining hated and failed ministers in the opinion of the vast majority of the Egyptian people, i.e. the ministers of foreign affairs, the interior and justice. In a televised interview…, Marshall Shafik recognized that President Mubarak was the one who imposed this trio on him, and forced him to keep them in his government. This may be true, but he still could have ousted them from his government during the Cabinet reshuffle conducted two weeks ago, following the fall of President Mubarak and his departure to his current place of exile… Maintaining a person such as Mr. Ahmed Aboul-Gheit, the foreign minister and dean of the bone-breaking academy, provoked the majority of the Egyptian people and constituted an insult to the honorable history of Egyptian diplomacy…

“Some might regret the departure of Marshall Shafik and some of his ministers, but we do not think that anyone will regret that of Mr. Aboul-Gheit, especially not in the Gaza Strip, after he threatened its population that he would break its hands and legs if it were to cross the border of the sister Egypt to evade the Israeli aggression and its white phosphorus, and to buy a carton of milk or a loaf of bread to feed the children. We do not know if Mr. Aboul-Gheit will end up in the same cell as his colleagues in the cabinet of corruption…, but the man committed crimes which are no less dangerous for Egypt than the crimes of the latter. Accountability should not be limited to accusations of embezzlement or squandering, considering there are more serious crimes committed by the former regime and its men against the Egyptian people. Therefore, Aboul-Gheit should be prosecuted for having jeopardized Egypt’s security – and even its very existence – through his blunt shortcomings a t the level of the Nile River file…

“He should also be held accountable for the collapse of Egypt’s regional role, and for his dubious silence which reached the level of conspiring with Israeli Foreign Minister Tzipi Livni to launch the aggression on the Gaza Strip, let alone the blockading of the Strip for over four consecutive years… Egypt is definitely changing for the best, or at least this is what we are now sensing through the steps of the military council, although we are hoping to see more. Indeed, who would have expected the Egyptian prosecutor to issue an order to freeze the fortunes of President Mubarak and his family, and investigate them all on charges of illicit profiting? Who would have expected the Egyptian government to oppose the imposition of no-fly zones requested by America over Libya? Furthermore, who would have ever imagined to see Egypt – the former leader of the moderation axis – allowing the passage of Iranian warships that were heading to the Syrian Latakia Port through the Canal of Suez,… while completely distancing itself from the positions and dubious alliances of the former regime?

“The Egyptian military institution is the only one that has not collapsed, despite the collapse of all the state’s political institutions which were built based on the moods, alliances and interests of the ousted president, his family and the businessmen mafia surrounding him… We thus ask this institution to continue its tasks, namely the cleansing of the Egyptian media from all the hypocrites among the mouthpieces of the former regime who shamelessly engaged in a process to mislead the Egyptian people, cover up the corruption crimes, and contain the Egyptian role to serve non-Egyptian and non-Arab agendas…” – Al-Quds al-Arabi, United Kingdom


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Una respuesta a “Egipto, palante”

6 03 2011
Raúl Fernández Justo (06:45:43) :

Las exigencias para “depurar” a los antiguos miembros del gobierno de Hosni Mubarack me parece que no son importantes en este momento(Marshall Ahmed Shafik dejó paso a Essam Sharaf como Primer Ministro provisional de Egipto, siendo, como fue,ministro de transportes con HN). Lo importante es que los tecnócratas(en el sentido más positivo del término) cumplan con su función de plasmar las pertinentes reformas a la Constitución para su posterior aprobación en referendum por el pueblo egipcio( ahora sí,sobre el que descansará la soberanía y legitimidad del nuevo gobierno.
Los juicios y responsabilidades por malversaciones,torturas y contubernios contra natura(léase Israel o Tipi Livni) vendrán más tarde de la mano del insobornable(así lo esperarán los jovenes de Tahrir o,incluso Los Hermanos Musulmanes) peso de la Ley. De las conferencias de prensa conjuntas de Condoleezza Rice y Tipi Livni negando cualquier situación de emergencia humanitari en Gaza aún conservo la rabia y la amargura…